Deaf History Essay Scholarships

Deaf History Unveiled

Interpretations from the New Scholarship

John Vickrey Van Cleve, Editor

Publication Year: 1997

Deaf History Unveiled features 16 essays, including work by Harlan Lane, Renate Fischer, Margret Winzer, William McCagg, and other noted historians in this field. Readers will discover the new themes driving Deaf history, including a telling comparison of the similar experiences of Deaf people and African Americans, both minorities with identifying characteristics that cannot be hidden to thwart bias. Other studies track societal paternalism toward deaf people in Italy, Hungary, and the United States. Adding to its intrigue, the new research in this milestone study provides evidence for previously uncredited self-determination of Deaf people in establishing education, employment, and social structures common throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Historians, teachers, and students alike will prize Deaf History Unveiled as a singular collection of insights that will change historical perspectives on the Deaf experience worldwide.

Published by: Gallaudet University Press

E-ISBN-13: 9781563681745
E-ISBN-10: 1563681749
Print-ISBN-13: 9781563680878
Print-ISBN-10: 1563680874

Page Count: 316
Illustrations: 20 photographs
Publication Year: 1997

OCLC Number: 44957997
MUSE Marc Record: Download for Deaf History Unveiled

Since the early 1970s, when Deaf history as a formal discipline did not exist, the study of Deaf people, their culture and language, and how hearing societies treated them has exploded. Deaf History Unveiled: Interpretations from the New Scholarship presents the latest findings from the new scholars mining this previously neglected, rich field of inquiry. The sixteen essays featured in Deaf History Unveiled include the work of Harlan Lane, Renate Fischer, Margret A. Winzer, William McCagg, and twelve other noted historians who presented their research at the First International Conference on Deaf History in 1991. Deaf History Unveiled travels from a monastery, in 16th-century Spain to banquets planned by and for Deaf people in 19th-century France, from the presses of a once-activist school newspaper in pre-Depression New Jersey to the founders & deaf education in Russia to the present. Readers will discover the new themes driving Deaf history, including a telling comparison of the similarities in experience among Deaf people and African Americans, both minorities with identifying characteristics that cannot be hidden to thwart bias. The paternalism of hearing societies resounds in separate studies of deaf education and the opportunities afforded deaf people in the United States, Italy, and Hungary. Adding to its intrigue, the new research in this outstanding volume provides evidence for the previously uncredited self-determination of Deaf people in establishing education, employment, and social structures common through-out the Northern hemisphere. Historians, teachers, and students alike will prize Deaf History Unveiled as a singular collection of insights that will change historicalperspectives on the Deaf experience worldwide.

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