Frankenstein And Technology Essay

The Pursuit Of Technology In Mary Shelly's "Frankenstein"

The Industrial Revolution of the late eighteenth, and early nineteenth century created a significant advance in technology. Mary Shelly’s life and literature were influenced by this technological turning point. Thirst of knowledge is a dominant theme in Mary Shelly’s “Frankenstein”, and the driving force behind continuous technological developments. Human Beings are completely dependent on Modern technology and it would be difficult to survive without it. Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a growing reality. Many scientists are predicting a computer will soon pass the Turing test, thus making a human and machine indistinguishable. With breakthroughs in nanotechnology, humans will soon be able to sustain a longer life. Technological advancements have been speeding up since computing power is growing exponentially. With artificial intelligence and nanotechnology becoming more of a reality, Victor Frankenstein’s desire of cheating death is becoming more than just fiction.
Mary Shelley was born 1797 in London, to her influential father William Godwin, and her mother Mary Wollstonecraft who died giving birth to her. Growing up Mary was educated and tutored by her father, and because of his reputation she was surrounded by intellectuals during the Industrial Revolution. At the age of sixteen, Mary ran away to live with her future husband Percy Shelley, a free thinker that her father did not approve of. Her marriage with Percy ultimately leads to turmoil in Shelly’s relationship with her father. Mary spent the summer of 1816 in a Geneva with her husband Percy, Lord Byron, and John Polidori. The group decided to write a ghost story which eventually led to Mary Shelly’s novel Frankenstein: The modern Prometheus. The novel would be defined as Mary Shelly’s masterpiece and is still in print today. Frankenstein contained a vast amount of knowledge and inspirations throughout Shelly’s early life. A pursuit of knowledge is the distinctive theme in her novel that is influenced by the time and society that she was a part of (Hughes).
By the time Mary Shelley began to write Frankenstein, the Industrial Revolution was already taking place in Europe. Throughout the eighteenth century technological advances in steel manufacturing, steam-power and coal were the significant in the transformation of England from an agricultural country to an industrialized one (Hooker). The Industrial Revolution created capitalistic system that sparked a social revolution as well (Hooker). A rise in population was a product of it, and citizens congregated to the cities for work (Hooker). Manufacturing trades replaced agricultural positions that were declining due to the Revolution (Hooker). The Industrial Revolution also forged the Romantic Movement, which can also be seen in Shelly’s writings. The timeline in which Shelley lived helped develop the framework for Frankenstein, for it was during this time that advances in technology, industry, and science reached a major turning point in...

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There is nothing more profound about the topic of science and technology than its ability to be a partner in helping to save lives. It is so influencial in coming up with the latest drugs to combat harmful and even deadly diseases and viruses such as AIDS, and some cancers. We are where we are today because of the remarkable innovations in science and technology. The idea that lives can be saved from such innovations as a new flu vaccine, or a new type of antibiotic that can battle chicken pox, and many other diseases. Its all about the advancements that we get from science and technology that let us live the way we do. Now, we dont have to worry about dying from the chicken pox or…show more content…

I can still hear my mom telling this story, like it was just yesterday. Certainly in the early eighties, they were still coming up with such advancements, I am curious as to whether or not they tested on animals or did other things that we might put into question in todays society.

It makes me think just what they had to do to get such advancements and how other things were effected by them-- whether it be a life lost, animal testing, or something else. Science is a wonderful thing. It gives up the opportunity to create life, cure diseases, and so many other things that make our lives much more enjoyable. It is because of science that we, the United States, are where we are today. which is a hell of a lot more than any other developed or developing country can say. Just recently, within the past two years, we have finally been able to decode the human genome. Having accomplished that, we can now pin point exactly on which chromosome a certain mutation has occured, and now we can use that information to get a cure to treat it. Because of this, many more children will make it to reproductive maturity. There is just so much to be learned and discovered out there, that scientists cant work fast enough! Along with the great things that accompany such great advancements, there is the issue of what is ethical and moral in the way that scientists are able to come up with the tests and experiments that will be used to further enrich our lives for

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