Atestat Engleza Model Argument Essays

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Lucrare de Atestat la Limba Engleza

Diana- Princess of Hearts

Introduction

Princess Diana is one of my favourite celebrities. This is why I decided I must do my research paper about her, like a tribute to everything she meant and still means to me and all the people who found hope and a role model in her.

Characterizing Princess Diana with any sweeping generalizations is an exercise in futility. Those who categorize her solely by her charitable work would be as one-sided in their assessment as others who describe her as a needy soul who searched in vain for true love. Though it remains a pleasant notion to remember Diana for the enormous humanitarian impact she made on the world, it is not realistic to sketch her picture solely by those efforts. The princess was an enigmatic figure who led a complex life.

In her lifetime she accomplished many great things. She worked on numerous charity projects; she was also one of the most photographed people during her lifetime. A particular thing that I liked very much at her was her elegance. She was the only celebrity I have ever seen with natural and elegant manners. She was polite with everybody nearby, including media, the citizens waiting to greet her and the under-privileged she was visiting.

She had the ability to handle almost every problem, just by caring for everybody at each event. She always smiled pleasantly. She made everybody feel comfortable, including the audiences watching her in the TV programmes! How powerful her charm has been!

The Princess was well known both for her support of charity projects and her sense of style. She was also credited with considerable influence for her campaigns against the use of landmines and helping the victims of AIDS. In fact, Princess Diana was the first high-profile celebrity to be photographed touching a person infected with the HIV virus. She visited landmine survivors in hospitals, toured demining projects run by the HALO Trust, and attended nine awareness education classes about the dangers of landmines immediately surrounding homes and villages. One of the reasons that Princess Diana’s charity work is so special is because she truly believed in participating in helping, not just giving money. The Princess fought for so many different causes that one can really tell how much she cared for humanity in general and how she sincerely wanted to end suffering wherever it occurred. Princess Diana even said, “I understand people's suffering, people's pain, more than you will ever know yourself…”

The Princess’s will to help these landmine workers demonstrates how directly connected she was to the people. She cared about them strongly enough to make sure she was involved personally to protest against what she thought to be wrong. Time magazine writes, “First she became the patron saint of victims, sick, discriminated against, the homeless”. Heroines are allowed to make mistakes too. Diana’s adulterous marriage brought her down to the level of any other ordinary person. The Princess admittedshe had been depressed, self-mutilated and bulimic. This allows the public, especially women, to empathize with the way she was feeling. Diana’s demonstration of how to overcome an obstacle and the way she turned a helpless life into one of aiding others, shows why people look up to her and idealize her.

AsDiana was such a realistic woman, she inspired other women to live up to their potential. She cared for all children, no matter what. She was like a universal mother. Her love for children was evident in her social work and also in her own family life. Diana placed much value on the family unity. Princess Diana stresses how much she appreciates families. Princess Diana’s ability to be a good mother made her a genuine heroine.

Diana-The Queen of People’s Hearts

'I would like to be a queen in the hearts of the people.' (Princess Diana)

Short Biography

Lady Diana Frances Spencer (July 1, 1961–August 31, 1997) was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales. She was often called Princess Diana by the media and the public, but she did not possess such a title and was not personally a princess, a point Diana herself made to people who referred to her as such. Princesses in their own right only exist by creation of the monarch or by birth. Diana was in fact the first non-princess to be Princess of Wales for centuries. Diana, Princess of Wales was noted for her charity work. Yet her philanthropic endeavours were overshadowed by her scandal-plagued marriage to Prince Charles. Her bitter accusations via friends and biographers of adultery, mental cruelty and emotional distress visited upon her, and her own admission of adultery and numerous love affairs riveted the world for much of the 1990s, spawning books, magazine articles and television movies. From the time of her engagement to the Prince of Wales in 1981 until her death in a car accident in 1997, the Princess was arguably the most famous woman in the world, the pre-eminent female celebrity of her generation: a fashion icon, an image of feminine beauty, admired and emulated for her high-profile involvement in AIDS issues, and the international campaign against landmines. During her lifetime, she was often referred to as the most photographed person in the world. To her admirers, the Princess of Wales was a role model - after her death, there were even calls for her to be nominated for sainthood - while her detractors saw her life as a cautionary tale of how an obsession with publicity can ultimately destroy an individual.

Early life

Diana Frances Spencer was born at Park House on the estate. On the death of her paternal grandfather, Albert Spencer, 7th Earl Spencer, in 1975, Diana's father became the 8th Earl Spencer, and she acquired the courtesy title of Lady Diana Spencer and moved from her childhood home at Park House to her family's sixteenth-century ancestral home of Althorp.Diana was educated at Riddlesworth Hall in Norfolk and at West Heath Girls' School in Sevenoaks, Kent, where she was regarded as an academically below-average student, having failed all of her O-level examinations. In 1977, aged 16, she left West Heath andbriefly attended Institut Alpin Videmanette, a finishing school in ). Diana was a talented amateur singer, excelled in sports and reportedly longed to be a ballerina.

Wedding to Prince Charles

Her wedding with Prince of Charles took place at St Paul's Cathedral in London on Wednesday 29 July 1981.Diana was the first Englishwoman to marry the heir to the throne .Upon her marriage, Diana became Her Royal Highness .The Princess of Wales and was ranked as the third most senior royal woman in the United Kingdom after the Queen and the Queen Mother.The Prince and Princess of Wales had two children, Prince William of on 21 June 1982 and Prince Henry of (commonly called Prince Harry) on 15 September 1984.


Break up of Marriage

In the mid 1980s her marriage felt apart, an event at first suppressed, but then sensationalised, by the world media. Both the Prince and Princess of allegedly spoke to the press through friends, accusing each other of blame for the marriage's demise. Charles resumed his relationship with Camilla Parker Bowles, whilst Diana became involved with James Hewitt and possibly later with James Gilbey, with whom she was involved in the so-called Squidgygate affair. She later confirmed (in a television interview with Martin Bashir) the affair with her riding instructor, James Hewitt. After her separation from Prince Charles, Diana was allegedly involved with married art dealer Oliver Hoare and rugby player Will

Carling. She did publicly date heart surgeon Hasnat Khan before becoming involved with Dodi Fayed.The Prince and Princess of Wales were separated on 9 December 1992; their divorce was finalised on 28 August 1996. The Princess lost the style Her Royal Highness and instead was styled as Diana, Princess of Wales. However, since the divorce, has maintained that Diana was officially a member of the Royal Family, since she was the mother of the second and third in line to the throne.

Death

On 31 August 1997 Diana was involved in a car accident in the Pont de l'Alma road tunnel in Paris, along with her friend and lover Dodi Al-Fayed, and their driver Henri Paul. Fayed's bodyguard Trevor Rees-Jones is the only person who survived the wreckage. The death of the Princess has been widely blamed on reporters,that were reportedly hounding the Princess, and were following the vehicle at a high speed. Ever since the word paparazzi has been associated with the death of the Princess.

Charity work

AIDS

Starting in the mid-to-late 1980s, the Princess of Wales became well known for her support of charity projects.Despite her love of social events, Diana stayed very active in charity events around Great Britain.She became the president of Barnardo’s, a charity that looked after troubled children.. In the early 1980s, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had just been identified as a specific disease. As some medical researchers attempted to find its cause, others began to actively look for a cure..At the beginning of the AIDS health crisis in the 1980s, people often avoided touching anyone who had contracted the disease. Few people knew its causes, and many were afraid they could get the disease merely by shaking hands with an infected person.

AIDS charities would have growing significance to Diana. Throughout her life Diana was something of a rebel. Her work with victims of AIDS could in some ways be seen in this regard. She was one of the first very high profile people to be pictured touching those afflicted with AIDS. This had a significant impact in changing people’s opinions and attitudes to the disease it was certainly a charity not following the protocol and tradition of the Royal family. The British media was impressed that she did it without wearing gloves. “She gave it respectability and a profile,” said a professor who focused on the AIDS epidemic at Middlesex. “HIV [the virus that causes AIDS]does not make people dangerous to know, so you can shake their hands and give them a hug: Heaven knows they need it,” Diana said. Although she felt ignored by the royal family, Diana came to realize that, outside the palace walls, her star power could help unleash millions of dollars in donations to help those in need. She began to attend as many charity events as possible. In addition to helping raise money at these events, Diana also spent hours in hospitals visiting the sick and dying, as well as in homeless charities visiting those in need. Her mere presence often brought comfort to people she touched. Her contribution to changing the public opinion of AIDS sufferers was summarised in December 2001 by Bill Clinton at the 'Diana, Princess of Wales Lecture on AIDS', when he said: 'In 1987, when so many still believed that AIDS could be contracted through casual contact, Princess Diana sat on the sickbed of a man with AIDS and held his hand. She showed the world that people with AIDS deserve no isolation, but compassion and kindness. It helped change world opinion, and gave hope to people. AIDS with an outcome of saved lives of people at risk.'

Throughout her life Diana was something of a rebel. Her work with victims of AIDS could in some ways be seen in this regard. She was one of the first very high profile people to be pictured touching those afflicted with AIDS this had a significant impact in changing people’s opinions and attitudes to the disease it was certainly a charity not following the protocol and tradition of the Royal family. AS Princess Diana said: “HIV does not make people dangerous to know. You can shake their hands and give them hug heaven knows they need it'.

Diana shakes hands with an unidentified 32-year-old AIDS patient in his private room at , , on April 19, 1987.

Meanwhile, progress was being made by researchers. Although there is still no cure, drugs have been developed that help control the HIV infection and may delay the onset of AIDS. Today, more than one million Americans and more than 33 million people around the world live with HIV/AIDS. To the media Diana often portrayed a very stoic and positive energy, but an aid suggested that at the same time these engagements often drained Diana emotionally at the end of some engagements she felt depleted. Diana had a very personable touch. She was very at ease in meeting people from any background and even if they were ill or in hospices. The patients would react very favourably to her meetings, they warmed to her life energy and heartfelt sympathy. Part of her appeal was her sympathy and natural compassion. She could empathise with people’s suffering, having suffered much herself.

Princess Diana also made clandestine visits to show kindness to terminally ill AIDS patients. According to nurses, she would turn up unannounced, for example, at the Mildmay Hospice in , with specific instructions that these visits were to be concealed from the media.

International Campaign to Ban Landmines

Through her work with the Red Cross, Diana became involved with the International Campaign to Ban Landmines. ICBL was little known until Princess Diana made it her favorite charity this year, traveling to and on its behalf,” said an article in Newsweek. Because of Diana’s international influence, the movement might now spread to protect people around the world from being maimed by mines. Her visit to , in fact, was turned into a television documentary that increased the land mine cause’s profile.

Perhaps her most widely publicised charity appearance was her visit to in January 1997, when, serving as an International Red Cross VIP volunteer she visited landmine survivors in hospitals, toured de-mining projects run by the HALO Trust, and attended mine awareness education classes about the dangers of mines immediately surrounding homes and villages. The pictures of Diana touring a minefield, in a ballistic helmet and flak jacket, were seen worldwide. (In fact, mine-clearance experts had already cleared the pre-planned walk that Diana took wearing the protective equipment.) In August that year, she visited with the Landmine Survivors Network. Her interest in landmines was focused on the injuries they create, often to children, long after the conflict has finished.

She is widely acclaimed for her influence on the signing by the governments of the and other nations of the Ottawa Treaty in December 1997, after her death, which created an international ban on the use of anti-personnel landmines. Introducing the Second Reading of the Landmines Bill 1998 to the British House of Commons, the Foreign Secretary, Robin Cook, paid tribute to Diana's work on landmines:' All Honourable Members will be aware from their postbags of the immense contribution made by Diana, Princess of Wales to bringing home to many of our constituents the human costs of landmines. The best way in which to record our appreciation of her work, and the work of NGOs that have campaigned against landmines, is to pass the Bill, and to pave the way towards a global ban on landmines. '

As of January 2005, Diana's legacy on landmines remained unfulfilled. The United Nations appealed to the nations which produced and stockpiled the largest numbers of landmines (, , , , and the ) to sign the Ottawa Treaty forbidding their production and use, for which Diana had campaigned. Carol Bellamy, Executive Director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), said that landmines remained 'a deadly attraction for children, whose innate curiosity and need for play often lure them directly into harm's way.

Although Diana’s death was a huge loss for the organization, its members have continued to work toward its goals. In addition to its Bosnia-Herzegovina office, it has now established regional offices in , , , , , and . The organization’s many programs reach out to land mine survivors in 43 of the most-affected countries and regions in the world, including and . Her personal support is said to have been a significant factor in encouraging and then other countries to support the Ottawa Treaty which sought to introduce a ban on the use of anti – personnel landmines. When Robin Cook brought the second reading of the landmines bill to the house in 1998 he made a point of paying tribute to the contribution of Princess Diana. Despite her love of social events, Diana stayed very active in charity events around . No other members of the royal family, it seemed, made themselves more available to the charity circuit. She became the president of Barnardo’s, a charity that looked after troubled children. She was also the guest of honour at an elaborate event that became known as the Tiffany Ball, which raised money for the AIDS Crisis Trust. Although she felt ignored by the royal family, Diana came to realize that, outside the palace walls, her star power could help unleash millions of dollars in donations to help those in need. She began to attend as many charity events as possible. In addition to helping raise money at these events, Diana also spent hours in hospitals visiting the sick and dying, as well as in homeless charities visiting those in need. Her mere presence often brought comfort to people she touched.

February 1992, Diana comforts a dying woman at Calcutta

Conclusions

In conclusion, Princess Diana was a great person and a heroine. She is not my idol just because she was part of the royal family. Princess Diana attempted to solve some of the world's problems. She worked in charity projects and went against landmines. She is one of my role models because of her accomplishments.

In short, Princess Diana was just one of the most beautiful celebrities in the world. She was a good mother for her two sons. She had a kind heart to care for everybody. She has done her best to take the responsibility of being a royal member. She has made the world much more beautiful. Although she died, she will always be an example for our ladies to imitate in good manners.

Diana will be remembered not for just one of her accomplishments, but for many other things, from giving birth to the future King of England to showing kindness to the sick, to touring an Angolan minefield, to being identified as the “People’s Princess”. Her personality was caring and giving, but did not come without struggles from within herself. Out of the sadness in her life, Diana developed into a highly respected woman and was noted for her sense of style, charisma, humour and high-profile charity work. She developed into not only notable leader, but an inspiration for many people throughout the world. Upon her death, the world was greatly saddened by the loss.

Diana was the very essence of compassion, of duty, of style, of beauty. All over the world she was a symbol of selfless humanity. Someone with a natural nobility who was classless and who proved that she needed no royal title to continue to generate her particular brand of magic.

Some may say that Princess Diana lived a fairy tale. But upon examining her life events and obstacles, one can see that Diana was not only a real heroine, but also, a real person. Princess Diana was a living heroine. She personified how a woman should strive to become the best what she can.

Sheshowed how to act appropriately in public. Not that Diana believed in putting on appearances that were not true, but she always showed a face to the world that was presentable and real. Her grace and loveliness show what women are really capable of everything.

Along with her motherly qualities and charitable inclinations, Diana retained and perfected her feminine charm and eloquence. Her sense of style and charm made her a role model. Princess Diana further used her fashion sense and femininity to once again help the public. She auctioned off her most famous dresses to the public to help raise money for charities she worked for. This is a wonderful demonstration of using one’s femininity for the public good.

Diana’s funeral, a worldwide event, demonstrated accurately how powerful and moving she was as a heroine. She was followed by many mourners that had been inspired by her warmth, intelligence, grace, and care for humanity. Her death had such a wide impact on not just , but the world, that one must admit what a motivational heroine she was and will continue to be. Her death in some ways seems to inspire people even more than her work while she was alive.

BIBLIOGRAPHY


óTanya Lee Stone,1999,” Diana: Princess Of The People(Gateway Biographies)”, Millbrook Press

óSherry Beck Paprocki,2009,”Diana, Princess of : Humanitarian (Women of Achievment)”,Chelsea House Publications

óAdrian Kear,1999,”Mourning Diana: Nation, Culture and the Performance of Grief”, Routledge
óStuart Maslen,2004,” Mine Action After Diana: Progress in the Struggle Against Landmines”, Pluto Press

óMartin Gitlin,2008,”Diana,Princess of : A Biography ( Biographies)”, Press

ó Mark Cerasini ,2004,Diana,Queen of Hearts”, Random House

óhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana,_Princess_of_Wales

óhttp://learningtogive.org/papers/paper88.html

óhttp://www.biographyonline.net/people/biography_princess_diana.html

óhttp://www.answers.com/topic/diana-princess-of-wales

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ARGUMENT...................................................................................2SUMMARY....................................................................................2THE STORY UNDER THE ‘BIG APPLE’ SKYLINE..................................3HISTORY OF NEW YORK CITY.........................................................3

Lenape and New Netherland: prehistory – 1663...................................................4British and revolution: 1664–1783.......................................................................5Federal and early America: 1784–1854................................................................6Tammany and consolidation: 1855–1897.............................................................6Early 20th century: 1898–1945...........................................................................7Post-World War II: 1946–1977.............................................................................9Modern period: 1978–present.............................................................................9Portrait...........................................................................................................10

Description of The Big Apple.............................................................................................10Social Life.........................................................................................................................12

A NEW YORK STATE OF MIND.......................................................15

Cultural Life.....................................................................................................15

Entertainment and performing arts....................................................................................15 Tourism..............................................................................................................................16Media.................................................................................................................................17Cuisine...............................................................................................................................18Accent................................................................................................................................18Sports................................................................................................................................19City Sights..........................................................................................................................19Broadway theatre..............................................................................................................24Wall Street.........................................................................................................................24

Entertainment..................................................................................................25

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